Rich of Omega 3 The muscle has a high proportion of Omega-3 fatty acids and iron, giving the meat its wild game flavour. The distinctive taste is a result of the wild pastures; the grass and the aromatic and spicy herbs on which the lambs graze.
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Recipe

Nutrition

Flavored by the wild pastures

In an environment where con-sumers are increasingly conscious of their health, food must be safe to eat, pure and nutritious. For these reasons, Icelandic lamb meat is becoming recognized throughout the world for its healthy nutritional value and unique taste.

The Icelandic sheep is a direct descendant of the sheep first brought to the island by the Viking settlers. It has not been crossbred by importing other breeds. The cold climate influences the composition of the plants the sheep graze on. The lambs also move freely through extensive wild pastures in pristine mountainous landscapes. This, and the young age at slaughter (4-5 months), gives the meat unique quality and properties. The average carcass weighs around 16 kg (35 lbs.). The muscle has a high proportion of Omega-3 fatty acids and iron, giving the meat its wild game flavour. The distinctive taste is a result of the wild pastures; the grass and the aromatic and spicy herbs on which the lambs graze. Some subtle differences have been noted between the flavour of meat from lambs grazing in the highlands, the lowlands, and by the seashore. The meat is very tender and has a fine texture due to its high amount of red muscle fibres, which is influenced both by the breed and its grazing habits. The tenderness is enhanced by electrical stimulation and strict control of chilling rates.

- The lambs move freely
- Tender meat
- Fine texture
- High proportion of Omega-3 fatty acids
- Lambs are 4-5 months old at time of slaughter